Category Archives: office spaces

A desk for dogs and their human

DeskBanner This western maple standing height desk was designed for a human, although consideration was also given to the dogs that often accompanied her to the office.  From the perspective of the dogs, the desk is both something to lounge under and the place where treats are kept, the latter being a far more important design element.  From the perspective of the human, it was important that the desk have efficient storage that was neither bulky nor cluttered, felt light, was of the scale of her office, and was made of something local and beautiful.  In her words:

I want to tell you how happy I am to stand at this desk. It not only works as I hoped it would, but it's REALLY beautiful, which makes me smile daily. Couldn't ask for more. The dogs have become fully acquainted with the special dog treat section and now sit and stare at it, trying to will it open.Thanks for doing such a great job and being so easy to work with.

-EK

EKdesk

The Professors

Parts of two new faculty offices that were conveniently just a couple doors down from one another, both in Oregon white oak.  The offices were recently renovated; and the two new faculty occupants were in need of space efficient cabinetry and furniture that provided good function without taking up valuable floor space.  Offices on campus are typically small (the larger of the two measures about 14' x 14'), especially in the aged Condon Hall, where offices were chopped up and made into even more offices.

In the first office, bookcases with built-in space for a fridge, small counter with room for a tea kettle and accoutrements, and a microwave (not pictured); and a small Prairie-inspired meeting table and set of three chairs of white oak with a Polyx Oil finish.  Osmo Polyx Oil is a low-VOC, hand applied finish made from plant-based oils and waxes, and has become my favorite to use on most furniture and some cabinetry.  It soaks into the grain and dries hard, creating a durable finish that brings out woods natural beauty.  Plus, it is apparently approved for use on children's toys in Germany, so if German kinder can chew on it, then what more reason do I need?

With chairs, so much of the effort is spent setting up each operation during the building process.  Even with a fairly simple chair design, as these were, each chair part needs to be touched eight or ten or twelve or more times just to get it ready for assembly.  And with so much time spent on the set up, rather than making three, I made ten.  (Plus, I needed new chairs for the kitchen, because the several times reglued and reupholstered hand-me-down dining room chairs were just about spent).

In the second office, the client wanted space for books, a locking drawer, and places to set photos and plants.  In order to keep the cabinet from being too dominant in the office, I staggered the heights of the sections and left plenty of space around the window.  (The office has nearly 12' ceilings, which is two feet taller than the office is wide, so if the cabinet were too tall it would quickly diminish the light scattered by the upper walls and cause it to feel more closed in).