Tag Archives: polyx

ApplePly art studio

StudiocornerThe client had been working on the conversion of a garden room into an insulated and heated art studio.  The room would still retain the functions of garden tool storage and candle making area, but she also wanted a dedicated space for her multiple mediums of art and where supplies could be stored at close reach. Studio ApplePly, manufactured right here in Eugene, was an easy material choice.  The eastern maple panel faces are perfect for slab doors and drawer fronts, and the uniform laminations make a distinctive exposed edge; and, without any need to face the edges, the cost savings helped keep the budget down.  Osmo Polyx oil and wax finish brings out a warm glow in the maple, and creates a durable coating without the high VOC's of most other finishes.  Angle iron from the scrap yard was repurposed as drawer and door pulls, and the weathered steel texture is in subtle contrast to the ApplePly.

Walnut Mantle

WalnutMantleArch The former fireplace surround was porcelain tile and painted mdf, and the homeowner was looking to make use of local materials to update the focal point of the living room.  The tile was replaced with travertine, and the nicely figured black walnut was milled by Curly Burly.  I used a hand-rubbed Polyx Oil finish to really help the figure pop.  Often, some of the more muted violet and grey tones in black walnut will become less distinct when finished; and I was pleased that the color variations remained so prominent in the finished piece. WalnutMantle    

The Professors

Parts of two new faculty offices that were conveniently just a couple doors down from one another, both in Oregon white oak.  The offices were recently renovated; and the two new faculty occupants were in need of space efficient cabinetry and furniture that provided good function without taking up valuable floor space.  Offices on campus are typically small (the larger of the two measures about 14' x 14'), especially in the aged Condon Hall, where offices were chopped up and made into even more offices.

In the first office, bookcases with built-in space for a fridge, small counter with room for a tea kettle and accoutrements, and a microwave (not pictured); and a small Prairie-inspired meeting table and set of three chairs of white oak with a Polyx Oil finish.  Osmo Polyx Oil is a low-VOC, hand applied finish made from plant-based oils and waxes, and has become my favorite to use on most furniture and some cabinetry.  It soaks into the grain and dries hard, creating a durable finish that brings out woods natural beauty.  Plus, it is apparently approved for use on children's toys in Germany, so if German kinder can chew on it, then what more reason do I need?

With chairs, so much of the effort is spent setting up each operation during the building process.  Even with a fairly simple chair design, as these were, each chair part needs to be touched eight or ten or twelve or more times just to get it ready for assembly.  And with so much time spent on the set up, rather than making three, I made ten.  (Plus, I needed new chairs for the kitchen, because the several times reglued and reupholstered hand-me-down dining room chairs were just about spent).

In the second office, the client wanted space for books, a locking drawer, and places to set photos and plants.  In order to keep the cabinet from being too dominant in the office, I staggered the heights of the sections and left plenty of space around the window.  (The office has nearly 12' ceilings, which is two feet taller than the office is wide, so if the cabinet were too tall it would quickly diminish the light scattered by the upper walls and cause it to feel more closed in).